705 East Central Ave, LaFollette, TN, US
|
Phone: 423-562-3531 / Fax: 423-566-9993

Welcome to Campbell County Veteran Affairs Office

What kind of Claims

Disability Claims

 CompensationDisability Compensation

Disability compensation is a monthly tax-free benefit paid to Veterans who are at least 10% disabled because of injuries or diseases that were incurred in or aggravated during active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training. A disability can apply to physical conditions, such as a chronic knee condition, as well as a mental health conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Benefit

The benefit amount is graduated according to the degree of the Veteran's disability on a scale from 10 percent to 100 percent (in increments of 10 percent). Compensation may also be paid for disabilities that are considered related or secondary to disabilities occurring in service and for disabilities presumed to be related to circumstances of military service, even though they may arise after service. Generally, the degrees of disability specified are also designed to compensate for considerable loss of working time from exacerbations or illnesses.

If you have dependents, an additional allowance may be added if your combined disability is rated 30% or greater. Your compensation may be offset if you receive military retirement pay, disability severance pay, or separation incentive payments.More information about disability compensation benefit amounts can be found on the Compensation Rates page.

Eligibility

  • Service in the Uniformed Services on active duty, OR
  • Active duty for training, OR
  • Inactive duty training, AND
  • You were discharged under other than dishonorable conditions, AND
  • You are at least 10% disabled by an injury or disease that was incurred in or aggravated during active duty or active duty for training, or inactive duty training

Note: If you were on inactive duty for training, the disability must have resulted from injury, heart attack, or stroke.

Evidence Required

  • Medical evidence of a current physical or mental disability, AND
  • Evidence of a relationship between your disability and an injury, disease, or event in military service. Medical records or medical opinions are required to establish this relationship.

Note: Under certain circumstances, VA may conclude that certain current disabilities were caused by service, even if there is no specific evidence proving this in your particular claim. The cause of a disability is presumed for the following Veterans who have certain diseases.

Presumed Disability

  • Former prisoners of war
  • Veterans who have certain chronic or tropical diseases that become evident within a specific period of time after discharge from service
  • Veterans who were exposed to ionizing radiation, mustard gas, or Lewisite while in service
  • Veterans who were exposed to certain herbicides, such as by serving in Vietnam
  • Veterans who served in Southwest Asia during the Gulf War

Example 1

During a weekend drill, an Army Reservist injures her knee while participating in a physical training class. She is eligible for compensation for residuals of the knee injury.

Example 2

An individual enlisted in the U.S. Navy on June 10, 1988, and served for a period of 3 years. He was honorably discharged on June 9, 1991. During his active duty, he fell from a bunk and injured his back. Based on his active service, he is entitled to service-connected benefits for the residuals of his back injury.

How to Apply

For more information on how to apply and for tips on making sure your claim is ready to be processed by VA, visit our How to Apply page.

Low Income Pension for Veteran/Spouse

 

Veteran Non-Service-Connected Pension (NSCP)

The VA Non-Service-Connected Pension is a needs-based program aimed at providing financial assistance to low income, permanently and totally disabled wartime veterans.

A. Who Is Eligible?

You may be eligible if:

  • You were discharged from service under Honorable conditions or, General Under Honorable Conditions, AND
  • For veterans who entered active duty BEFORE September 7, 1980, you must have served 90 days or more of active duty with at least one day being during a period of war you didn't have to be in combat, just have been in the service at least one day during a period of war. NOTE: Veterans who entered active duty AFTER September 7, 1980, must have served at least 24 months of active duty service. If the total length of service is less than 24 months, the veteran must have completed their entire tour of active duty, AND
  • Your countable income is below a certain amount determined by Congress yearly, AND
  • You meet the net worth limitations, AND
  • You are age 65 or older, OR, you have a permanent and total non-service connected disability, OR, you are patient in a nursing home, OR you are receiving Social Security disability benefits.

B. How Much Does VA Pay?

The amount VA pays depends on a number of factors such as your combined yearly income, the severity of your current health status, your marital/dependent status, etc.  Contact the VA at 1-800-827-1000 to find out the current rates of pay for your situation as the rates change yearly.

C. How Can You Apply?

As there are many factors that go into filing a proper Non-Service-Connected Pension claim,  we recommend that you contact our office.


Widow Pension

 

Survivors Pension

The Survivors Pension benefit, which may also be referred to as Death Pension, is a tax-free monetary benefit payable to a low-income, un-remarried surviving spouse and/or unmarried child(ren) of a deceased Veteran with wartime service.

Eligibility

The deceased Veteran must have met the following service requirements:

  • For service on or before September 7, 1980, the Veteran must have served at least 90 days of active military service, with at least one day during a war time period.
  • If he or she entered active duty after September 7, 1980, generally he or she must have served at least 24 months or the full period for which called or ordered to active duty with at least one day during a war time period.
  • Was discharged from service under other than dishonorable conditions.

Survivors Pension is also based on your yearly family income, which must be less than the amount set by Congress to qualify.

While an un-remarried spouse is eligible at any age, a child of a deceased wartime Veteran must be:

  • Under 18, OR
  • Under age 23 if attending a VA-approved school, OR
  • Permanently incapable of self-support due to a disability before age 18

Your yearly family income must be less than the amount set by Congress to qualify for the Survivors Pension benefit. Learn more about income and net worth limitation, and see an example of how VA calculates the Survivors Pension benefit.

How to Apply

To apply for Survivors Pension, download and complete VA Form 21P-534EZ, “Application for DIC, Death Pension, and/or Accrued Benefits” and mail it to the Pension Management Center (PMC) that serves your state. You may also visit your local regional benefit office and turn in your application for processing. You can locate your local regional benefit office using the VA Facility Locator.

DIC for Surviving Spouse

 

Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

DIC is a tax-free monetary benefit generally payable to a surviving spouse, child, or parent of Servicemembers who died while on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training, or to survivors of Veterans who died from their service-connected disabilities. Parents DIC is an income-based benefit for parents who were financially dependent on of a Servicemember or Veteran who died from a service-related cause.

Learn more about DIC and Parents DIC

Appeals

VERY IMPORTANT

 

The Board of Veterans' Appeals (also known as "BVA" or "the Board") is a part of the VA, located in Washington, D.C.

Board members review benefit claims determinations made by local VA offices and issue decisions on appeals. These law judges -- attorneys experienced in veterans law and in reviewing benefit claims -- are the only ones who can issue Board decisions. Staff attorneys, also trained in veterans law, review the facts of each appeal and assist the Board members. {38 U.S.C. §§ 7103, 7104}

Anyone who is not satisfied with the results of a claim for veterans benefits (determined by a VA regional office, medical center or other local VA office) should read the "How do I Appeal" pamphlet. It is intended to explain the steps involved in filing an appeal and to serve as a reference for the terms and abbreviations used in the appeal process.